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Author Topic: Pouring / Injecting into stone molds  (Read 45 times)

IceTroll

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Pouring / Injecting into stone molds
« on: January 27, 2020, 07:15:50 pm »
So I have a question for you all. I have one stone mold that I purchased only because no one else except this one supplier offered a 2" goby mold of this style.  Now I know stone molds are a bit less precise than aluminum molds and harder to pour but I am wondering if there is a temperature range other than the traditional 350F that I use with aluminum molds that may work better with stone molds.
Currently I use a light brushing of veg. oil on the mold as recommended by the manufacturer and inject at 350 degrees. With this process I still am lucky to run a 75% success rate. The failures are hollow spots in the finished bait or a not completely formed bait. There does not appear to be any issues with air in the plastisol as the rest of the molds I pour from the same injector fill come out perfectly.
I was hoping someone out there had some experience with stone molds they may be willing to share.

Thanks all for your time.

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Rick

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Re: Pouring / Injecting into stone molds
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2020, 07:01:25 pm »
I have no personal experience with manufacturing stone molds but the material is very inferior to aluminum. It does not transfer heat well which causes the injected plastisol to cool and solidify before the cavities are completely filled. Higher plastisol temp. may help but you will run the risk of scorching it.
Vegetable oil is not compatible with any brand of plastisol and I wouldn't recommend using it with soft plastic baits ever...
Plastisol is a petroleum based product and veggie oil is not.  Vegetable oil will dry up in a short time frame and ruin your baits. 

IceTroll

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Re: Pouring / Injecting into stone molds
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2020, 07:27:47 pm »
Thanks for the info. I know they are not as good as aluminum molds but no one makes a goby like this one in a 2" size in aluminum. That is why I purchased stone. The vegetable oil is a recommendation from the manufacturer. I will try it with out and also try warming the mold slightly to see if it helps.

Maybe a small goby mold like 1.5 " - 2" would be something you should look into. Goby are prevalent in all of the great lakes and perch (not to mention most other game fish) love them. Especially on Little Bay DeNoc. Problem most manufacturers only make 3" and larger and that size puts it out of the range for most perch. I am sure that it is a lot of work but may give you a product no one else offers.  Just a thought.


Rick

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Re: Pouring / Injecting into stone molds
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2020, 07:58:03 pm »
I hear you and I understand your need for a mold. The problem is available time to devote to it. I have hundreds of other existing molds and products that I have to ship before I can consider adding another to the line up.
 

deckertje

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Re: Pouring / Injecting into stone molds
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2020, 09:51:55 pm »
there are a couple supliers of artificial stone molds from ukrain, most of them are no good quality, but there are couple with better quality, where the stone is actually smooth, a bit like a hard plastic, and I'm happy with some of the molds I have, other are just rubish, if you drop your mold on the floor, it's broken, but sometimes it's great to find mold forms that you don't find from other makers... and  not have to make them yourself..